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SOCIAL
FORUM

2013
marzo/march

Livia Signorini
di Federica Galletto

Livia Signorini vive e lavora tra Roma e Milano. Collagista di livello, specialità a cui si dedica da molti anni, ha esposto in diverse gallerie nazionali e internazionali.  Nel 2012  ha illustrato per Tara Books la ristampa del libro di Charles Dickens “Pictures from Italy”. Questo importante lavoro artistico le ha dato modo di esercitare al meglio la sua capacità di “narratrice per immagini”, qualità che la contraddistingue, così come il paziente e certosino amore di ricerca per immagini insolite e antiche. Ho acciuffato per un soffio Livia Signorini, in procinto di partire per Parigi; lei, scusandosi per la brevità delle risposte perché molto di fretta, ha comunque accettato gentilmente di rispondere alle domande della mia intervista.(...)

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FRIZZIFRIZZI

2013
marzo/march


Pictures from Italy. Dickens, illustrato da Livia Signorini
di Simone Sbarbati

(...) nuova edizione in inglese del “diario” dickensiano, illustrata dai collage dell’illustratrice e traduttrice italiana Livia Signorini. Un’edizione pubblicata lo scorso ottobre—in occasione del bicentenario della nascita dell’autore—da Tara Books e ben recensita dai media americani (...)

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IMPRINT

2013
febbraio/february

Long Live Illustrated Books!
by Buzz Poole

(...) On the occasion of Dickens’s 200th birthday, Tara Books has published a gorgeous excerpted edition of this travelogue, featuring Italian artist Livia Signorini’s “dialogue with the text.” (...)
It is no wonder that Signorini was moved to assemble collages that embrace the span of time that clearly resonated with Dickens as he explored Italy. Images from antiquarian books cozy up to Photoshop embellishments like enlarged rigatoni, made even more impressive by the gatefold pages across which these compositions spread, complementing Dickens’s running theme of the moment being everything and nothing, honoring the poignancy of stone, water, light, and shadow.


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BRAIN
PICKINGS


2013
febbraio/february

Pictures from Italy: A Whimsical Early
Travelogue by Dickens, Newly Illustrated
by Maria Popova

A beautiful modern resurrection of the author’s lesser-known early work.

In the 1840s, young Charles Dickens — born on this day in 1812 — traveled to Italy and France with his family, recording the experience in a lesser-known early work that was part travelogue, part imaginative fairy tale. Now, Indian independent publisher Tara Books — whose exquisite handmade gems and whimsical children’s picture-books you might recall — has brought Pictures from Italy (public library; UK) back to life in a beautiful new edition, illustrated by Italian artist Livia Signorini in 11 striking full-color gatefolds inspired by Dickens’s impressions, complemented by beautiful full-page black-and-white closeups.

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PUBLISHERS
WEEKLY

2012
dicembre/december

Pictures from Italy

This travelogue of Dickens's 1844 Italian sojourn retains the wit and sumptuous detail of his novels, but lacking an explicit narrative, the book never coalesces into much more than a series of sketches.  (...) In fact, the text is somewhat secondary in this handsome edition; the primary reason to obtain this volume is the gorgeous illustrative work of Italian artist Livia Signorini. Collaging old maps, postcards, and photographs, Signorini's design complements the introspective nature of Dickens's text, particularly when she interprets his surreal vision of Venice in an eerie, dream-like four-panel spread. (...)

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BROOKLINE BOOKSMITH

Pictures from Italy

Dickens' wonderfully entertaining and picturesque prose is paired with luminous fold-out illustrations by artist Livia Signorini for the traveler or Italophile in your life.

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T-MAGAZINE
The New York Times Style Magazine

2012
novembre/november

Bookshelf
by Stephen Heyman

“Pictures From Italy” dusts off an early Dickens work, a whimsical cross between a fairy tale and a travelogue covering his trips to Italy and France with his family in the 1840s. This version includes beautiful illustrated collages by the Italian artist Livia Signorini.


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FIRST
CITY

2002
ottobre/october

Pictures from Italy

FirstCity Books unravels the gossamer threads that bind together Livia Signorini, Italy and Charles Dickens

(...) Dickens, who paints both his characters and his landscapes with great pain, infusing great detail into every facial tic, every little bylane, has, Livia agrees, “a distinct visual style”, but she’s careful to add that “it was not immediately easy to discern”. Her very first visualising idea, as an artist, was to work on “a bird’s eye view”, we learn. From here, as the creative journey took over, Livia went on a trip of her own, to rediscover her country anew - amidst antique book sellers, collectors and dusty attics where she drew inspiration from books, maps, postcards and old photographs. (...)

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THE
HINDU

2012
settembre/september

Following Dickens’ footprints in Italy
by Staff Reporter

Contemporary Italian artist Livia Signorini recently went on a very special journey around her country – one which took her to every possible place – antique book sellers, collectors and attics where she took down dusty books, maps, postcards and old photographs.(...)
The artist’s work, which is nothing short of a brilliant recapturing of Dickens’ descriptions, is definitely intriguing to the viewer.
So when Dickens writes about the colosseum – “To see it crumbling there… its walls and arches overgrown with green… young trees of yesterday, springing up on its ragged parapets, and bearing fruit: chance produce of the seeds dropped there by the birds who build their nests within its chinks and crannies…”-- Livia’s interpretation with leaves, birds and old pictures of the Roman amphitheatre meshed together beautifully recreates the scene.

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THE
NEW
INDIAN
EXPRESS


2012
settembre/september

‘Dickens’ jokes were racist’
by Prashanti Ganesh

(...) In the illustrated version of the book, Italian artist Livia Signorini draws parallels between Dickens’ intriguing narrative and her art, with a special focus on the themes of place, memories and politics, with the dialogue resulting in a series of layered collages. (...)

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ARTELIBRO

2012
agosto/august

Tara Books presents Pictures from Italy

(...) In this illustrated edition by Tara Books, Italian artist Livia Signorini takes inspiration from Dickens’ words and plays with his sense of place, memory, and politics. The result is a brilliant contemporary dialogue with his work — a reading of history, time and change — which renews our sense of his enduring vision. (...)

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HARPER
BAZAR
INDIA


2012
agosto/august

Literary Pictures

Inspired by Charles Dickens’s travelogue of the same name, Pictures from Italy (Tara Books) is a pictoral reworking of the original book. Italian artist Livia Signorini presents pictures and illustrations that mirror Dickens’s enduring vision of the time he spent there. This tome not only recreates the magic of the city, but also pays obeisance to one of the greatest authors of all times in the 200th anniversary of his birth.

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UNDO.NET

2012
giugno/june

Pasquale Polidori e Livia Signorini - Lei stava lì

Lei stava li'. Un video, dei collages e delle opere su carta realizzati individualmente dai due artisti. Lavori tutti inerenti a testimonianze su casi di soprusi ai danni di donne, raccolte in un saggio di psicologia clinica del 2009. (...) Livia Signorini basa il suo lavoro sull’appropriazione di elementi materiali e frammenti culturali reperibili nel quotidiano e ricomposti in un discorso che talora è oggettuale e altre volte è affidato all’immagine fotografica o filmica.

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NY
ARTS
MAGASIN

2002
ottobre/october

Romantic Minimalism: Livia Signorini
by Matthew Rose

On a sun-bleached rooftop a stone’s throw from the Villa Borghese in Rome, artist Livia Signorini unfurls a "quilt" made of Horvath candy wrappers. The brightly-colored papers glued to a muslin backing are an ode to both minimalism in their strict repetition, and Pop Art in their appropriation of text and image from mass culture. The grid is loose and simple, formal and direct, yet the individual pieces belie an informal and indirect story, beginning the moment when each was opened and consumed. (...)

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